THE CHALLENGE

Educational inequity is a widespread problem across the United States. There are countless debates over how to effectively solve the issue. From federal policies to teacher corps to charter schools, all the proposed solutions are surrounded by controversy.

 

So in this highly opinionated and complicated atmosphere, how can college students get involved and become part of the solution? These young adults have experienced the American education system first hand and have lived through the attempts to fix it. They understand the problem from a unique perspective. But, each college student is so different. Not every student is studying the same major or comes from the same background so we are faced with the task of uniting a group of very diverse people.

 

And in this effort, how can we ensure that our impact is meaningful and works towards the change we want to see?

Closing The Distance

These two New York City high schools are only 0.5 miles apart but their difference in quality of public education has put much more distance between them. 

(Source: US News)

(Source: US News)

More than 52% of US public school students come from low-income families. 

(Source: NCES)

Access to quality public education is a basic human right, but because of social, cultural, and political factors not all students receive the quality education they deserve.